Category: 2016

Baton Rouge: A Divided City

By Dr. Lori L. Martin

“Baton Rouge is a city divided by many fault lines. A single street divides the city’s predominately white and black communities. North Baton Rouge, where Alton Sterling was killed, is under developed relative to south Baton Rouge. Access to emergency rooms, quality schools, healthy food, reliable transportation, and good jobs are limited, while health care complexes, blue ribbon schools, business and industry flow freely to the south.”

In Baltimore and Across the Country, Black Faces in High Places Haven’t Helped Average Black People

By Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Read the full article from In These Times, here.

“Fewer than 40 miles from Baltimore, in the nation’s capitol, resides the nation’s first African-American president. There are 43 Black members of Congress and two Senators—the highest number of Black Congress members in American history. And just as the West Side of Baltimore was erupting against the police killing of Freddie Gray, Loretta Lynch became the first Black woman appointed as Attorney General.”

How Flint, Ferguson and Baltimore are all connected

By Emily Badger

Read the full article from The Washington Posts, here.

“’On one level,’ says Henry Louis Taylor, ‘they all look and appear to be very, very different.’ But, argues the professor of urban and regional planning at the University at Buffalo, it’s about time we begin to talk about them in the same breath. ‘These are places that are left behind, forgotten,’ he says. ‘They’re places we’ve gotten very good at shielding from view.'”

Reflections on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Dream

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“King argued that Selma and the Voting Rights Act were nothing more than Phase One in the larger Black Liberation Movement. The Civil Rights Movement was about the struggle to remove the legal obstacles that constrained, circumscribed and limited the struggle for the larger freedoms. The Second Phase of the Black Liberation Movement would be about the fight to realize in practice these ‘larger freedoms.'”

Neighborhoods Matter

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“In the United States, we are conditioned to view racism through individual dispositions, situational frameworks and/or the practices of specific institutions. Rarely, if ever, do we see the association between the day-to-day struggles of working class blacks and the larger structures of racism. This harsh, down-on-the-ground reality is hidden from view by the cultural blinders of individualism, personal responsibility, and socioeconomic mobility.”

Why should we trust you? Clinton’s big problem with young black Americans

By Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Read the full article from The Guardian, here.

“The incongruent logic of deploring ‘systemic racism’ while championing the US as ‘the last, best hope of Earth’ lends itself to the constant questioning of Clinton’s sincerity. Perhaps she thinks that both can be true, but others might conclude that the candidate has either not truly grasped the depth or scale of the crises in black communities today, or that she will say anything to get votes.”