Category: Henry Louis Taylor, Jr.

Reflections on the Cuban International Conference on Hygiene and Epidemiology: Building Bridges of Cooperation with Latin America

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“The social determinants and social determination of health frameworks view health and disease as social products, which are unevenly distributed throughout society. Health, then, is a social phenomenon that intersects with health equity and social justice. It is influenced by multifarious social, economic and physical conditions, including economic stability, education, social and community context, health and health care, and neighborhood and built environment, and, as such, it requires an intersectoral approach to research, policy-making, and intervention.”

Reflections on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Dream

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“King argued that Selma and the Voting Rights Act were nothing more than Phase One in the larger Black Liberation Movement. The Civil Rights Movement was about the struggle to remove the legal obstacles that constrained, circumscribed and limited the struggle for the larger freedoms. The Second Phase of the Black Liberation Movement would be about the fight to realize in practice these ‘larger freedoms.'”

Neighborhoods Matter

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“In the United States, we are conditioned to view racism through individual dispositions, situational frameworks and/or the practices of specific institutions. Rarely, if ever, do we see the association between the day-to-day struggles of working class blacks and the larger structures of racism. This harsh, down-on-the-ground reality is hidden from view by the cultural blinders of individualism, personal responsibility, and socioeconomic mobility.”

The Long Struggle for Black Liberation

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“Today, 350 years after the first slaves landed in Jamestown; 150 years after the Civil War ended, 61 years after the Supreme Court outlawed segregation, 50 years after passage of the landmark Voting Rights Act, and 47 years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., blacks are still receiving an inadequate education, face police violence, high levels of unemployment, low-incomes, poverty and die prematurely. They are still living in neighborhoods characterized by bad housing, blighted surroundings, food deserts, supportive service swamps, and crime.”

Academics and Researchers Will Lead the Way in Cuba

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“Tourism is still forbidden and the embargo continues to cast its shadow across the island. Still, the new rules make it easier to travel to Cuba for educational and cultural purposes. So, I expect an explosion of activities on the education and cultural front. Already, dozens of colleges and universities, in all parts of the country, have established, or they are in the process of establishing varied education and cultural exchange programs with Cuba. Everywhere, education and cultural travel programs are popping up.”

The Four Horsemen of Structural Racism

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“The per capita income in Ladue is $90,000 annually. In Ferguson, it is $18,000; Black Jack, $23,000; Berkeley $14,000, and in Kinloch, $9,000. Ladue is 94% white and Ferguson, Black Jack, Berkeley and Kinloch are all more than 60% black. This metropolitan inequality is institutionalized and legitimized by the metropolitan governance structure, which has created a geography of race-class segregation that is reflected in developed and underdeveloped suburbs.”