COVID-19 – BUFFALO


Campaigns target Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy among Blacks, but access remains an issue

By Deidre Williams

Read the full article from The Buffalo News here.

“In Buffalo, predominantly Black and brown neighborhoods such as the East Side’s 14215 ZIP code and 14201 on the Lower West Side have higher infection rates. They were among 10 Buffalo ZIP codes initially targeted for mass vaccination at the Delavan Grider Community Center to reach traditionally underserved neighborhoods with higher infection rates and more hesitancy about the vaccine.”

Racial disparities plague vaccine rollout in WNY and across U.S.

By Caitlin Dewey

Read the full article from The Buffalo News here.

“In New York, white residents have received a disproportionate share of vaccines in each of the state’s 10 regions and in all five counties of Western New York. That disparity is especially dramatic in Erie County: While white residents make up just over 81% of the population, they account for almost 91% of the newly vaccinated. Black residents, on the other hand, represent 5.7% of all vaccinated people (compared to 13.1% of the population), while Asian residents make up 2.5% of those vaccinated (3.6% of the population) and Hispanic residents make up 2.2% (4.5% of the population).”

Amherst, Clarence and Orchard Park see higher Covid-19 vaccination rates

By Sandra Tan

Read the full article from Buffalo News here.

“When it comes to getting the Covid-19 vaccine in Erie County, affluence equals access. Of the top seven ZIP codes in Erie County where more than a fifth of residents have already received the Covid-19 vaccine, six came from the Amherst, Clarence and Orchard Park, which are among the wealthiest communities in the region…Meanwhile, of the dozen ZIP codes which have fewer than 10% of the population vaccinated, nine were from poorer neighborhoods in Buffalo/Cheektowaga…”

Grassroots push for more COVID-19 vaccines in Buffalo Black and Brown communities

By Thomas O’Neil White

Read the full article from WBFO here.

“Acknowledging that racism is a public health threat to communities of color, the Buffalo Common Council and local healthcare advocacy groups are prioritizing the equitable distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine to the city’s Black and Brown communities. The acknowledgement is part of a larger challenge to the pervasiveness of systemic racism, with health care being one of its pillars.”

For communities of color, there’s still uncertainty about the vaccine

By Karys Belger

Read the full article from WGRZ here.

“Henry-Louis Taylor, a professor at the University at Buffalo told 2 On Your Side, he’s heard similar hesitations from people he’s spoken to and the reasons are valid. ‘Historically, African Americans have been victimized by the medical industry. Many people are aware of the Tuskegee Syphilis experiments. There were efforts made to sterilize black women without their knowledge,’ he told 2 On Your Side.”

Buffalo Congregations, Others Make Real Difference ­in COVID-19 Response

By Tom Peterson

Read the full article from Stakeholder Health here.

“The data that informed their work was that, in the five or six ZIP codes where about 80% or 90% of African Americans live in Erie County (where Buffalo is), African Americans were off the charts in terms of the health disparity around every chronic disease: diabetes, heart disease, cancers, asthma. They were 300% more likely to have a chronic disease if they lived in those communities versus a white person who didn’t, and that translated into shorter lifespans, roughly 10 to 12 lost years of life and a lower quality of life for many.”

Report: PPP loan program shortchanged Buffalo’s Black neighborhoods

By Jerry Zremski

Read the full article from Buffalo News, here.

“The federal government’s main effort to rescue small businesses during the pandemic tended to benefit wealthier neighborhoods far more than predominantly Black parts of metro Buffalo, according to a new study by a group that researches federal policy and its implications nationwide. The study found that the ZIP code with the largest Black population in Buffalo, on the city’s East Side, received the smallest number of loans. Meanwhile, the most loans locally went to the 14221 ZIP code, which includes Williamsville and parts of Amherst and Clarence.”

Outside agitators? Where’s the proof?

From the WBEN Newsroom

Read the full article here.

“Politicians and police have been raising the spectre of “outside agitators” since the day protests began in Buffalo. For the most part, local media has amplified the message: Outsiders are slipping into town to incite violence and destruction. But arrest records suggest that narrative is not true.”

Protests could reshape post-coronavirus campus environments

By Paul Lane

Read the full article from Buffalo Business First, here.

“‘Over the last decade, we have replaced conversations around race with conversations around inclusion and diversity, which shifts the conversation and issue away so that we don’t have to deal with all of those complex issues that are related to grappling and dealing with race. Inclusion and diversity, in my view, has been nothing more than a smokescreen to marginalize the discussions of race and, in particular, the issues facing African Americans,’ said Henry Louis Taylor Jr., professor of urban and regional planning at UB’s School of Architecture and Planning.”

Jacobs School responds to Floyd killing

By Ellen Goldbaum

Read the full article from UBNow, here.

“Medical students and residents are engaged in the intense work of learning how to become physicians who can best serve the communities where they will eventually practice. At the same time, what’s happening in society at large has a major impact on shaping their medical education. Last week, students, medical residents, faculty and administrators of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB and the units in UB’s academic health center took action to respond to the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police and the international protests it has engendered against the backdrop of the global COVID-19 pandemic.”

Covid-19 lays bare health disparities in black community

By Caitlin Dewey

Read the full article from Buffalo News, here.

“As of May 7, per capita case counts were 88% higher in the county’s five majority black ZIP codes than they were in the rest of the county, according to a Buffalo News analysis of county Health Department data … That has forced many in this deeply segregated region to grapple urgently with the fact that white and black Buffalonians still experience far different health outcomes – an uncomfortable reckoning that one local health care advocate likened to that of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.”

Yes, this virus discriminates, because we still do

By Rod Watson

Read the full article from Buffalo News, here.

“In fact, many of the same health disparities that disproportionately affect African Americans are the very same health conditions that make a person more susceptible to severe illness from Covid-19. Yet very few people are talking about that, or what we should be doing about it. And the ones who are talking aren’t being heard.”