Tag: Center for Urban Studies

Buffalo’s Tax Assessment to Exacerbate Eviction Problem

By Ian Stern

“The question boils down to who has the right to a neighborhood? Is it the people who are living and have been living in their home and community for decades, with strong social and spatial ties? Or is it the people who want to live in the new up and coming neighborhood or the hospitals and medical research facilities and the people they employ?”

The CARES Act is Bi-Partisan Voodoo Economics at its Finest

By Ian Stern

“The ideology of the primacy of the market is oozing from this stimulus package and the rhetoric being used by Republicans. The proposed stimulus only proves Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s words true, ‘We have socialism for the rich, rugged individualism for the poor.'”

Tomorrow is Here

By Henry Louis Taylor Jr.

“We are now in unchartered waters. The world we knew yesterday no longer exists. The surreal is the new reality. This pandemic conjures up images of the deadly influenza pandemic of 1918. It is way too early to compare COVID-19 to that tragedy, but already this pandemic has generated a response the world has never seen before.”

Future City

By Beth Kwiatek

“What does it mean when a group of young Black faces walk into a suburban school and say, “We don’t belong here”? What does it mean when those same kids face judges who are all male and white? What does it mean when those Black kids see white kids build cities in The Congo, Morocco, and Zimbabwe?”

Higher education and the poverty challenge

By Henry Louis Taylor Jr.

“My argument is that the War on Poverty failed because it was based on a set of false assumptions. Poverty is not a curable disease caused by the interplay of culture and individual shortcomings, but rather it is a normalized economic state within the neoliberal capitalist system. Therefore, the positionality of people within the economy is determined by racialized labor market dynamics, which distributes high-, middle-, and low-income jobs to laborers in the workforce. Within this labor market system, poverty is a subdivision of the low-income employment sector.”