Tag: gentrification and underdeveloped neighborhoods

BLACK HISTORY MONTH: Inzajeano Latif

Essay by Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

Published by AOP

“In honour of Black History Month, member Inzajeano Latif shares his project, The Boisterousness of Silence: The Marginalised of Tottenham. An autobiography told through considered street portraits of the marginalised of Tottenham. ‘In telling their story, Inz tells his own story.'”

Buffalo’s Tax Assessment to Exacerbate Eviction Problem

By Ian Stern

“The question boils down to who has the right to a neighborhood? Is it the people who are living and have been living in their home and community for decades, with strong social and spatial ties? Or is it the people who want to live in the new up and coming neighborhood or the hospitals and medical research facilities and the people they employ?”

Scammer isn’t the real source of blight on Buffalo’s East Side

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“According to The News, HouHou and his investors littered and left the city’s communities with boarded-up and vacant, deteriorating, demolished, burned-down and vandalized houses. First and foremost, these neighborhoods were blighted long before HouHou came to Buffalo. Blight does not happen overnight or even in a few years. Neighborhood decline takes decades.”

Housing and Neighborhood Development

By Henry Louis Taylor Jr.

“Neighborhoods matter in the quest to mitigate the harmful effects of poverty and low-incomes on the lives of Erie County residents. An abundant literature argues that neighborhood contexts are, in themselves, important determinants of the life chances and outcomes of people’s lives. The individual, the neighborhood, and the institutions, found inside and outside the community, interact to influence the socioeconomic wellbeing of its residents.”

Baton Rouge: A Divided City

By Dr. Lori L. Martin

“Baton Rouge is a city divided by many fault lines. A single street divides the city’s predominately white and black communities. North Baton Rouge, where Alton Sterling was killed, is under developed relative to south Baton Rouge. Access to emergency rooms, quality schools, healthy food, reliable transportation, and good jobs are limited, while health care complexes, blue ribbon schools, business and industry flow freely to the south.”

Neighborhoods Matter

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“In the United States, we are conditioned to view racism through individual dispositions, situational frameworks and/or the practices of specific institutions. Rarely, if ever, do we see the association between the day-to-day struggles of working class blacks and the larger structures of racism. This harsh, down-on-the-ground reality is hidden from view by the cultural blinders of individualism, personal responsibility, and socioeconomic mobility.”