Tagged: national

Rather than sell their own blood, Indiana students go on strike

By Jake Watkins

Read the full article from Workers Today, here.

It is common for student workers to get second jobs and sell plasma to stay afloat,” John Ferrand from the Indiana Graduate Workers Coalition told People’s World. Ferrand said that salaries at Indiana University can be as much as $20,000 below a living wage,” as a calculator developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology lists for Monroe County Indiana]”

The Legacy of McCarthyism on Social Group Work: An HistoricalAnalysis

By Janice Andrews and Michael Reisch

Read the full article from The Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, here.

This paper explores the impact of McCarthyism on the ideology, education,
practice, and public image of group work. The authors argue that the
witchhunts that occured during the period and its climate of widespread
fear purges and political conservatism diminished the gains the social work
profession had made in the 1930s and 1940s through its participation in
progressive activities and left the profession, particularly social group work
ill-prepared for the issues and activism of the 1960s and 1970s

What Rising Gas and Rent Prices Mean for Families with Low Incomes

By Yonah Freemark

Read the full article from The Urban Institute, here.

Driven by the COVID-19 pandemic, a shaky recovery from 2020’s recession, and, now, the war in Ukraine, inflation has shot up in the United States and in countries worldwide. For Americans, recent dramatic surges in gas prices and rent have increased the costs of daily life at a quicker rate than wages.

Collective Ambitions: Amazon Workers on Their Union Fight

By Sudip Bhattacharya

Read the full article from Protean Magazine, here.

Sudip Bhattacharya’s interviews with workers at an Amazon facility in Staten Island reveal ruthless conditions, management’s overwhelming power—and how, despite that, they’ve found solidarity in organizing the Amazon Labor Union.

Black Covid patients receive fewer medical follow-ups, study shows

By Kynala Phillips

Read the full article from NBC News, here.

Black Covid patients are less likely to receive medical follow-ups after being hospitalized and more likely to experience longer waits until they can return to work, according to a University of Michigan study published Tuesday.

The study surveyed the health outcomes of 2,217 Covid patients in Michigan 60 days after hospitalization. The results found that more than 50 percent of patients of color were readmitted to the hospital within 60 days after being released. Patients of color were also more than 65 percent more likely to experience moderate to severe financial impact because of Covid-19.

Black patients, in particular, experienced challenges returning to the workplace after recovering from Covid. On average, it took Black patients 35.5 days to return to work, the longest delay of any racial group. Black adults were also less likely to be offered workplace accommodations when they returned to work in comparison to other racial groups, according to Dr. Sheria G. Robinson-Lane, a gerontologist and the lead researcher.

Black Covid patients receive fewer medical follow-ups, study shows

By Kynala Phillips

Read the full article from NBC News, here.

Black Covid patients are less likely to receive medical follow-ups after being hospitalized and more likely to experience longer waits until they can return to work, according to a University of Michigan study published Tuesday.

The study surveyed the health outcomes of 2,217 Covid patients in Michigan 60 days after hospitalization. The results found that more than 50 percent of patients of color were readmitted to the hospital within 60 days after being released. Patients of color were also more than 65 percent more likely to experience moderate to severe financial impact because of Covid-19.

Black patients, in particular, experienced challenges returning to the workplace after recovering from Covid. On average, it took Black patients 35.5 days to return to work, the longest delay of any racial group. Black adults were also less likely to be offered workplace accommodations when they returned to work in comparison to other racial groups, according to Dr. Sheria G. Robinson-Lane, a gerontologist and the lead researcher.

White House officials, anticipating vaccines soon for those 5 to 11, will rely on doctors, clinics and pharmacies

White House officials, anticipating vaccines soon for those 5 to 11, will rely on doctors, clinics and pharmacies

By Katie Rogers

Read the full article from The New York Times, here.

Biden administration officials, anticipating that regulators will make the vaccines available to 5- to 11-year-olds in the coming weeks, are laying out plans to ensure that some 25,000 pediatric or primary care offices, thousands of pharmacies, and hundreds of school and rural health clinics will be ready to administer shots if the vaccine receives federal authorization.

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