Tag: University at Buffalo

To celebrate resilience after the traumas of the past year, UB medical student launches a company

By Ellen Goldbaum

Read the full article from UB News Center here.

“You don’t get to be a physician of color and not engage in these conversations,” Collier said. “The paucity of diversity has made us, the medical students, the ones that our community goes to on so many issues. For example, to mitigate vaccine hesitancy. We play so many different roles.”

Speakers make case for giving financial reparations to descendants of slavery

By Barbara Branning

Read the full article from UBNow here.

“Darity pointed out that wealth is equated with a family’s well-being, and that a person’s financial agency leads to greater opportunity — for homeownership and building savings, for example. Currently, he said, Black people represent 13% of the population but hold only 2% of the nation’s wealth. Darity and Mullen ended their presentation with a synopsis of their detailed plan for providing substantial financial compensation to all eligible descendants of documented slaves.”

UB researchers release major U.N. report on food systems planning

By David J. Hill

Read the full article from UBNow here.

“The report comprises six sections featuring contributions from UB and other global food systems researchers. Topics covered include describing the many ways in which local governments influence a community’s food system, an overview of the field of food systems planning, examples of local government policies from across the globe, and case studies from a number of low- and middle-income countries where food systems present an opportunity for equitable innovation.”

UB professor’s book inspires Canada’s largest Black-led television production in history

By Bert Gambini

Read the full article from the UB News Center here.

“Foster’s book tells a story absent from other histories about how the expanding railroad industry of the 19th century and the emergence of luxury sleeping cars required employees to staff them. The sleeping cars were rolling full-service accommodations that allowed riders to stay on the train rather than in a hotel during stopovers. The passengers, unwilling to learn the porters’ names, called anyone working in that capacity “George.””