Tagged: Housing

The mirage of the Black middle class

By Anne Helen Petersen

Read the full article from Vox here.

“You buy a place, that place grows in value, and either you trade up to a bigger place or you keep it until you can pass it down to your kids or your kids get the money from its sale. Stability gives birth to even more stability. That’s not what happened with Dee’s family. ‘My grandparents were bludgeoned every time the economy took a downturn,’ Dee recalls, in part because of the legacy of redlining and the devaluation of property in Black neighborhoods.”

What’s Abolitionist Housing Policy?

By Krystle Okafor and Sophie House

Read the full article from Shelterforce here.

“Despite its complexities, abolition holds tremendous promise for the housing field. Technocratic solutions are an inadequate fix for housing policy’s bitter history of racism and expropriation. Such solutions also obscure visionary, bottom-up approaches to housing justice. Following abolitionists’ lead, we can think critically about the racism in our work, set ambitious end goals, build genuine relationships with frontline communities, and foster conditions and institutions to make those visions a reality. This trailblazing moment should not pass us by.”

Housing Field Reacts to Marcia Fudge HUD Nomination

By Miriam Axel-Lute

Read the full article from Shelterforce here.

“There are two strains of reaction to Fudge’s nomination in the housing world. One is a feeling that the choice by Biden of someone with little experience who clearly preferred another role reflects that he does not take housing policy as seriously as was hoped and that qualifications are taking a back seat to other considerations in the cabinet process…But still, some, especially those who have worked with her, do have an actively optimistic perspective that exceeds the carefully politic.”

Race, Residential Segregation, and the Death of Democracy: Education and the Myth of Postracialism

By Lori Latrice Martin and Kenneth J. Varner

Read the full article in Democracy&Education here.

“Community spaces where segregation occurs, such as housing and schools, will never serve or properly address the interests of the most marginalized and underrepresented of society, but they will do so for those from dominant and overrepresented factions of society.”

Newly Exclusionary Zoning Expected for Approval in Philadelphia Neighborhood

By James Brasuell

Read the full article from Planetizen, here.

“Clearly, the zoning changes expected for approval by the Philadelphia City Council run afoul of most of contemporary planning thought about the racist and discriminatory effects of exclusionary zoning and the negative financial and environmental consequences of parking regulations. Society Hill has been accused of playing by its own rules before, as described in detail by Inga Saffron, Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic for the Philadelphia Inquirer, in a column published in November 2019.”

Poor kids get hit twice when landlords ignore lead law

By Rod Watson

Read the full article from Buffalo News, here.

“Exposure to lead in chipping, peeling paint can cause brain and nervous system damage, slow a child’s growth and development, and cause learning and behavior problems. The damage can be irreversible. Yet the only recourse for a parent unwittingly renting a lead-infested property is to file their own lawsuit. And even then, the federal Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act doesn’t allow for punitive awards, or even for the lifetime impacts of stunted development. It allows only for ‘3 times the amount of damages incurred by such individual.'”

AG: Buffalo landlord knowingly allowed dozens of kids to be lead poisoned

By Samantha Christmann

Read the full article from Buffalo News, here.

“Since 2013, at least 63 of the Dalfin-controlled properties have been cited for lead hazards, and nearly two dozen Dalfin properties have been associated with lead poisoned children, the attorney general’s office said. After receiving the initial citations, Dalfin and an associated group of businesses and individuals rented the homes to families anyway without making any of the lead remediations required by law, the office said.”

Eviction is Not the Answer

By Lee Flannery

Read the full article from Planetizen, here.

“Matthew Desmond, director of the Eviction Lab at Princeton University, understands the devastating impact of eviction during a time when unemployment has reached levels to rival those seen during the Great Depression. Demond’s recent opinion piece describes the real-life consequences of insufficient federal rental aid support and a housing crisis that forces the majority of sub-poverty line tenants to allocate over half of their income to rent.”

The Four Horsemen of Structural Racism

By Henry-Louis Taylor, Jr.

“The per capita income in Ladue is $90,000 annually. In Ferguson, it is $18,000; Black Jack, $23,000; Berkeley $14,000, and in Kinloch, $9,000. Ladue is 94% white and Ferguson, Black Jack, Berkeley and Kinloch are all more than 60% black. This metropolitan inequality is institutionalized and legitimized by the metropolitan governance structure, which has created a geography of race-class segregation that is reflected in developed and underdeveloped suburbs.”

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